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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of Diabetes mellitus and the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer found in the catalog.

Diabetes mellitus and the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer

Lorraine L. Lipscombe

Diabetes mellitus and the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer

a retrospective population-based cohort study.

by Lorraine L. Lipscombe

  • 33 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


About the Edition

There is evidence that type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) may increase postmenopausal breast cancer risk, possibly through hyperinsulinemia and/or insulin resistance. This question has not been adequately examined in an exclusively postmenopausal female population. Using Ontario health databases, this retrospective cohort study compared breast cancer incidence between women, aged 55 to 79 years, with newly diagnosed DM (N = 73,796) to women without DM (N = 391,714). After 2.1 million person-years of follow-up from 1994 to 2002, there was a significant age- and income-adjusted increase in breast cancer among women with DM (hazard ratio, HR, 1.08, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.01-1.16, p = 0.021). Prior breast cancer prevalence was also higher in women with DM versus controls (odds ratio, OR, 1.13, 95% CI 1.08-1.18, p < 0.0001). DM did not affect survival following breast cancer. As DM care becomes more complex, it will be important to ensure that adequate primary care such as breast cancer screening is maintained.

The Physical Object
Pagination96 leaves.
Number of Pages96
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19217125M
ISBN 100494073152

title = "Diabetes, metformin, and breast cancer in postmenopausal women", abstract = "Purpose: Emerging evidence suggests that metformin may reduce breast cancer incidence, but reports are mixed and few provide information on tumor by: Menopause is the time in a woman's life when her period stops. It usually occurs naturally, most often after age Menopause happens because the woman's ovaries stop producing the hormones estrogen and progesterone. Some symptoms require treatment. Talk to your doctor about how to best manage menopause. Make sure the doctor knows your medical.

Raloxifene reduces the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. In postmenopausal women, aromatase inhibitors (AIs), including anastrozole and exemestane, reduce breast cancer recurrence, improve survival, and reduce breast cancer risk in women at high risk. Aromatase inhibitors are not yet approved for breast cancer prevention. Similar to animal model, human studies demonstrated a link between hyperinsulinemia and the risk for breast cancer. One study, although was conducted on postmenopausal women without diabetes, the Women’s Health Initiative, reported that fasting insulin levels, independent of obesity, were strongly associated with breast cancer risk. Studies Author: Andra-Iulia Suceveanu, Adrian-Paul Suceveanu, Andreea-DanielaGheorghe, Laura Mazilu.

  The results of a recent study provide insights into the mechanism by which estrogen can decrease insulin resistance and the production of glucose, reducing incidences of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Meta-analysis of 5 cohort studies on diabetes and mortality from breast cancer yielded a summary RR of and CI of for women with versus without diabetes. Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that diabetes is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. In the Nurses' Health Study, a total of 87, postmenopausal Author: Subhashini Yaturu.


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Diabetes mellitus and the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer by Lorraine L. Lipscombe Download PDF EPUB FB2

When analysis was restricted to those studies where risk estimates of breast cancer could be obtained for post-menopausal women with type 2 diabetes, the risk of breast cancer was elevated (SRR (95% CI, –)).

The risk of breast cancer in studies with type not reported is slightly higher than the main by:   Diabetes mellitus and cancer are major causes of morbidity and death worldwide. 1 In the United States alone, by there were approximately 24 million people with diabetes (approximately 8% of the adult population) 2 and million survivors of breast cancer.

3 Recent research has focused attention on the effect of comorbid conditions on Cited by: An increased risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women with diabetes (15, 11–20) was reported by an Italian group.

36 An earlier study 37 by the same group did not find an association between diabetes and breast cancer, although the frequency of diabetes was very low (41%), probably because of underdiagnosis of diabetes. 39 Weiss Cited by: Diabetes, Overweight and Risk of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer the risk of the disease (OR=, 95% CI ).

Surprisingly, a history of any type of dislypidemia was. Results. Prediabetes increased the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women (adjusted OR95% CI –) as did diabetes (adjusted OR95% CI –).Cited by: 9.

Increasing risk of diabetes mellitus in postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed primary breast cancer Chih-Yuan Wang1,*, Shyang-Rong Shih 1, Kuo-Chin Huang2 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, N ational Taiwan University Hospital, National Ta ipei University, and 2Department of Family Medicine, Author: Chih‐Yuan Wang, Shyang‐Rong Shih, Kuo‐Chin Huang.

An association between diabetes and cancer is becoming increasingly recognised. For instance, women with diabetes have an estimated 20% higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer [1, 2] and up to a 50% increase in mortality after breast cancer diagnosis [3, 4].This association is hypothesised to be due in part to the effects of insulin resistance and Cited by: The analysis of diabetes (largely type 2) and endometrial cancer is based on 16 studies (three cohort and 13 case-control studies), includ participants and 7, cases of.

Evidence suggests that women with type 2 diabetes may be at increased risk of breast cancer, possibly due to chronic exposure to insulin resistance and/or hyperinsulinemia.

The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of breast cancer in postmenopausal women with and without diabetes.

Using population-based validated health databases from Ontario, Cited by: Breast cancer is a common form of cancer – the most common cancer in women – that develops inside the tissue of the breast.

This section explains how breast cancer, which can also occur in men, is linked to diabetes in addition to what the common risk factors and symptoms of breast cancer are and how the disease is treated.

Menopause itself is not associated with an increased risk of developing r, the rates of many cancers, including breast cancer, do increase with addition, some of.

Diabetes mellitus is a common condition that has been associated with increased incidence of breast cancer, 1–3 a finding recently challenged by reports from large population-based studies.

4,5 Nonetheless, diabetes is linked to adverse breast cancer outcome. 6 A meta-analysis 7 and two recent studies 6,8 found that patients with breast cancer and diabetes had significantly Cited by: “Both these changes might have a prognostic importance for postmenopausal women with breast cancer, but no diabetes mellitus,” the authors reported.

As high serum insulin and testosterone levels are linked with increased risk of breast cancer, they concluded that metformin may have the ability to prevent or treat breast cancer in non.

Postmenopausal women who develop breast cancer are at higher risk of developing diabetes mellitus than women in the same age group who do not have breast cancer. Women who have received hormonal ther Author: Chih‐Yuan Wang, Shyang‐Rong Shih, Kuo‐Chin Huang.

Purpose Breast cancer treatments have been associated with an increased risk of multiple health-related adverse outcomes, but the relationship with diabetes remains unclear.

This study investigated the association between hormone therapy and diabetes risk in breast cancer survivors. Patients and Methods We performed a case-cohort study of 2, female survivors Cited by: 6.

Moreover, several meta-analyses have associated type 2 diabetes with colon, postmenopausal breast, and pancreatic cancers, three of the five leading causes of cancer mortality in the United States The risk of liver cancer rises % in those with type 2 diabetes13; the risk of developing endometrial and bladder cancers, and non-Hodgkins.

Researchers arrived at this result after analyzing 40 studies done on diabetes acting as a risk factor for breast cancer. The studies, examined by the International Prevention Research Institute, had analy breast cancer cases across four chers found that post-menopausal women have an additional risk of developing breast cancer if they.

Women who lived in areas with higher levels of lead, mercury, and cadmium in air pollution had a greater chance of developing postmenopausal breast cancer. Postmenopausal women who had higher levels of vitamin D in their blood or who reported taking vitamin D supplements at least four times a week had lower rates of breast cancer.

Metabolic disorders, especially type 2 diabetes and its associated complications, represent a growing public health problem. Epidemiological findings indicate a close relationship between diabetes and many types of cancer (including breast cancer risk), which regards not only the dysmetabolic condition, but also its underlying risk factors and therapeutic by: Breast cancer is cancer that develops from breast tissue.

Signs of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a change in breast shape, dimpling of the skin, fluid coming from the nipple, a newly-inverted nipple, or a red or scaly patch of skin. In those with distant spread of the disease, there may be bone pain, swollen lymph nodes, shortness of breath, or yellow stic method: Tissue biopsy.

Obesity and diabetes have been linked to increased breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. Both of these conditions involve insulin resistance, which elevates the circulating levels of insulin.

Since insulin promotes cell division and enhances breast tumor growth in animal models, the Einstein scientists determined that relatively high.

These studies involved o cases of breast cancer across four continents and found that post-menopausal women with type II. The risk of postmenopausal breast cancer was significantly increased for women with MetS (OR =95% CI –, for three or more MetS components, P for trend for increasing number of components Cited by: